News


Charity Officials Are Increasingly Receiving Million-Dollar Paydays

The Wall Street Journal

About 2,700 people had seven-figure pay packages at the nonprofits in 2014, a number that was up a third in three years, newly searchable IRS data show...
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CEO Gives Back

Comprehensive Prospect Research

For Giving Tuesday 2016, Eagle Scout Tim Halpern led his son’s Cub Scout Troup in a volunteer food drive effort...
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Video: CEO Tim Halpern leading a major gifts panel on June 17th 2016

Association of Fundraising Professionals - New York City Chapter


CEO Tim Halpern to lead a major gifts panel on June 17th 2016

Association of Fundraising Professionals - New York City Chapter

Why do we feel we’re always building our major gifts portfolio? Because we are! Construction never ends. A prospect list is never final. It must evolve. Whether you’re just starting a prospect list or replenishing one, there are proven strategies to help ensure your pipeline overflows with top prospects...
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Legal Fees Cross New Mark: $1,500 an Hour

The Wall Street Journal

The day of the $1,500-an-hour lawyer has arrived. Partners at some of the nation’s top law firms are approaching—and, in a few cases, surpassing—that watershed billing rate, making the $1,000-an-hour legal fees that once seemed so steep look quaint by comparison...
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Why This Market Meltdown Isn’t a Repeat of 2008

The Wall Street Journal

The end isn’t nigh. Yes, there are losses, and big ones, as financial markets on Friday extended a brutal selloff that has ricocheted around the world since the year’s start. The carnage has become so pronounced it has engendered fears of a replay of the 2008 global financial crisis...
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New York City Property Values Surge

The Wall Street Journal

New York has become a trillion-dollar city, according to city tax assessors.

New preliminary tax rolls released Friday show that with rising values for both residential and commercial properties, the total market value of taxable property rose to $1.072 trillion for the fiscal year beginning July 1, a 10.6% increase from the $969.4 billion reported this year...


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IRS Reverses Course on Controversial Donor-Data Proposal

Chronicle of Philanthropy

The Internal Revenue Service today withdrew a controversial proposed regulation that would have given nonprofits the option to report donors’ private information to the agency.

Donors who make gifts greater than $250 to charity are required to get a "contemporaneous written acknowledgment" of their donation when they claim a tax deduction. The IRS proposal would have allowed the nonprofits, rather than the donors, to report the gift, including the donor’s name, address, and Social Security number...
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Charitable Giving in U.S. Continues to Rise

The Wall Street Journal

Mirroring growth in the domestic economy, charitable giving by Americans rose to a record $358.38 billion last year, surpassing a previous high of $355.17 billion in 2007, according to a closely watched annual report...
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The Surprising Relationship Between Taxes and Charitable Giving

The Wall Street Journal

When it comes to charitable giving, it’s well known that taxes matter. The promise of a big deduction is a great way to get people to open their checkbooks.

Yet the relationship between taxes and giving isn’t as simple as it looks...
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Charities Ended 2011 on High Note

Wall Street Journal

Several major charities ended 2011 on a high, with some nonprofits conducting record-breaking holiday-season campaigns. Fund-raisers said the early numbers could signal a continued bounce-back for charitable giving this year after falling in 2008 and 2009 from its prerecession peak...
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Metropolitan Opera Donations Hit $182 Million

New York Times

In the warren of Met administrative offices, the people who run one of the world’s busiest opera houses had something to applaud: a record amount of contributions for the fiscal year that ended in July. According to preliminary figures released for the first time, the Met hauled in $182 million, an astonishing amount in a tough economic climate and 50 percent more than it raised just the year before...

Met management said that much of this success with donors can be credited to the work of the Met assistant manager in charge of fund-raising, Coralie S. Toevs, who is considered a master of wooing and strategizing...

The Met reported that the $182 million raised last year came from 49,100 donors, although Met trustee David G. Knott acknowledged that the bulk of the Met’s big gifts comes from a small number of donors. "A lot of the very wealthiest can give year in and year out," he said...
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U.S. charitable giving shows modest uptick in 2010 following two years of declines

Cambell Company

CHICAGO (June 20, 2011) – Giving USA Foundation™ and its research partner, the Center on Philanthropy at Indiana University, today announced that total charitable contributions from American individuals, corporations and foundations were an estimated $290.89 billion in 2010, up from a revised estimate of $280.30 billion for 2009. The 2010 estimate represents growth of 3.8 percent in current dollars and 2.1 percent in inflation-adjusted dollars...
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U.S. charitable giving falls 3.6 percent in 2009 to $303.75 billion

Boston.com

CHICAGO—Charitable giving fell by 3.6 percent last year as Americans continued to struggle with the recession, though some philanthropic experts feared the decrease could have been much worse given the economic downturn, according to an authoritative annual survey released Wednesday...
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U.S. charitable giving estimated at $307.65 billion in 2008

Nonprofit Pro

Charitable giving in the United States exceeded $300 billion for the second year in a row in 2008, according to Giving USA 2009. Donations to charitable causes in the United States reached an estimated $307.65 billion in 2008, a 2 percent drop in current dollars over 2007.

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Family Charities Get Focused

The Wall Street Journal

When Charlie Brink sold his stock in Mona Vie, a beverage company that he co-founded in 2005, he wanted to use $5 million from his windfall to fund his family's charity work. But when the family launched the Brink Family Foundation, "everyone in the family had their ideas," of where to direct the funds, but there is "only so much our dollars can do in these economic conditions," he says. So the family decided to focus their giving with a formal mission statement directed toward two areas: access to education and their hometown of Tampa, Fla.

"If our foundation is going to weather this economic storm, we need to be serious and focused," Mr. Brink says.
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When Rosenwald Asks, The Wealthy Can't Say No

The New York Times

He swears that in the half-century since his mother pressed a single, tiny mustard seed into his hand, not a day has gone by that he has not touched that ancient symbol of faith and good fortune.

Fifty years is a long time, but given the persistent providence that has accented E. John Rosenwald Jr.'s life, it is possible to believe that he never left behind the seed for a second. Straight out of Dartmouth College's business school, he joined Bear, Stearns & Company, and raced lickety-split to the Wall Street brokerage's highest offices, becoming co-president, then vice-chairman, while amassing a fortune that he promptly started giving away.

Along the way, he found that he also had a knack for getting others to give away their money, often in prodigious amounts.
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